Company of Heroes: Eastern Front

Author Topic: German tanks/ vehicles Question  (Read 8772 times)

Offline Miles Dixon

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2013, 05:01:18 PM »
Studied a bit about that and guess it is hard for me to get such books especially involved on weaponry. Anyway I think answers are better as sometimes reading on tons of words and letters are quite confusing though.

That explains why the German army are quite advanced in terms of weaponry and the numbers are quite confusing, even the rifles and HMGs too have the numbers like MG32,34,436 then to 3 again... MP1-MP40 -.-

And wonder why German troops are all begins with the term PanzerXXXXX since the Panzer means tanks in German?

Offline Gerrit 'Lord Rommel' G.

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2013, 07:20:15 PM »
I'm confused where u found those datas...
Well.. All in all this are indenture numbers or "Year of development/introduction". Sometimes there is a system for weapon names, sometimes there is no system.
But for german MGs i cant find a problem because numbers rise till MG 45 (army weapons/ Luftwaffe had other numbers). So german army (Heer) used for weapons
in most terms the year of development or introduction for a weapon number. MG 34 was introduced in 1934 (on paper). MG 42 in 1942 (El Alamein). MP 38 was
introduced in 1938 and the all metal version MP 40 in 1940.
For the most weapons it is quiet easy to find and understand the system.

About the term "Panzer" -> Jeah. It is a german word for tank. A longer and "more" professional term is "Panzerkampfwagen" (armored vehicle).
But it would take too long to explain you my mother tongue and our wordsystem/neologism and stuff like this xD
May the force be with you.

Offline Jeff 'Robotnik' W.

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2013, 10:57:55 PM »
German tanks for example used muzzle break to reduce the recoil effect and "recoil brakes" (R├╝ckholbremsen - dont know the english technical term here)
to use the recoil energy to throw out the old round.

This would fall under the term "semi-automatic" in the English language

Offline Gerrit 'Lord Rommel' G.

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2013, 11:03:10 PM »
Jeah. But semi automatic is the term for the hole construction, right?
I dont know the word to the element that absorbed the recoil energy  ;D
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Offline Miles Dixon

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #19 on: July 23, 2013, 05:01:04 PM »
It seems that the numbers are making me confused as well, but I think there are 2 types of MG draws my interest, which is MG34 and MG42.

From what I studied it seems that MG3 is better than MG45 as MG45 is just a prototype. It states that MG42 (typo, sorry) is a weapon that uses till now like HMG M1919. Another thing that I am pretty confused is that MG42 was the best MG at that time (so many variants on MG42), how does the weapon drop to Austria's hands?

And I think the terms and names used are quite unique as well which makes me found it interesting. And it seems that even the term Volks also have 2 different meaning but from what I understand, Volksgrenadiers as an example, is an army that drafted from normal citizens, where they called it People's army and the concept should be similar like Conscripts. But it seems that there are second meaning for that, which related to nationalism?

Offline Jeff 'Robotnik' W.

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Re: German tanks/ vehicles Question
« Reply #20 on: July 23, 2013, 07:31:23 PM »
Jeah. But semi automatic is the term for the hole construction, right?
I dont know the word to the element that absorbed the recoil energy  ;D

It depends on which part. We usually just call the whole thing a "recoil system", which is made of a "recuperator" and "recoil buffer"